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Anchorage Family Law Legal Blog | Eschbacher & Eschbacher

Can you seek sole custody of your children in an Alaska divorce?

Protecting the relationship that you have with your children may be the most important consideration in your upcoming divorce. Many couples have trouble agreeing on the terms for custody, and some people even attempt to use custody of their children as a way to punish their ex.

Whether you just want to ensure you play an active role in your children's lives or you worry that your ex may try to limit your access to your children, focusing on child custody can help you protect and legally solidify this most important of relationships.

5 steps to take when you're getting ready to divorce

You've been thinking about getting a divorce, but you want to know that you have everything prepared before you talk to your spouse. Fortunately, there are some things you can do to prepare.

The following are five things you can do, in order to have a smooth divorce. You can also reach out to your attorney first to discuss options pertaining to your divorce if you're not sure where to start.

When Alaskans had to 'prove' in court they should get divorced.

While getting divorced in Alaska is not necessarily a quick or emotionally easy, the legal process is much simpler than it used to be. In fact, divorce is less difficult to obtain than it was not so long ago.

Traditionally, to get divorced you had to have legal grounds to dissolve your marriage, and there were relatively few reasons the law considered valid grounds. In Alaska, grounds for divorce included:

What am I supposed to do if I can’t make child support anymore?

Every parent wants to do right by their child. Whether you are the primary caregiver, are the one picking them up and dropping them off from school or are there as financial support, every bit of parenting counts. Helping financially in the form of child support can become complicated, however, especially if you suddenly can no longer make your payments.

If you recently lost your job, incurred an unexpected new expense or for some other reason are truly no longer able to provide the same amount of financial support, then you will need to make arrangements for it right away. These are a few ways you can remedy this problem.

How protective orders can put an end to domestic violence

By the time you finish reading this blog, about 40 people will have been physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. While rates have declined since the mid-1990s, the number of victims is still sky high.

Many authors and researchers tackle the topic of domestic violence in an attempt to inform the public, advance research and help victims and survivors. Throughout the vast collection of literature on the topic, researchers have theorized the roots of domestic violence, created classifications for the various types of assailants, and developed self-help books, but those books are best used by people in a position to help.

Homeowners association disputes

Homeowners associations are common in various types of developments. Referred to as the "HOA," the homeowners association is the governing body of the subdivision or complex. When a person buys real property in an area that has an HOA, they are automatically a member of the association. This means that they are responsible for paying dues. Typically, these funds cover common areas like swimming pools, golf courses and recreation centers.

As a homeowner, you are responsible for abiding by the conditions and restrictions of the contract. Many HOAs have a board that governs the community. This board is responsible for managing the dues that residents pay, and may also assist in resolving issues among neighbors.

Finding safe places for domestic violence victims

Sometimes, a domestic abuse victim has limited options when she and her children decide to flee an abuser and their home. But they are options nonetheless. You’ve asserted yourself, made a painful decision and have decided it’s time to protect yourself and your children. It’s time to leave your home for a safer environment.

But where do you go? If you have the fortune of having nearby family, and they are willing to let you stay with them, do so. However, many domestic abuse victims don’t have that option, so temporarily living in a shelter surrounded by strangers becomes a common choice. They may be strangers, but they share the same experiences of being victims of stalking, domestic violence or sexual assault.

What A Protective Order Can Do For You

Divorce is difficult enough, but being a victim of domestic assault or abuse makes the whole process more challenging and dangerous for you and your children. Here are some facts about protective orders in Alaska and what an order against your spouse or domestic partner can do for you.

What Is A Protective Order?

Pros and cons of a domestic partnership in Alaska

Not all couples follow the traditional path of dating, marriage, and raising children. Some couples don't want the religious or societal connotations of marriage, but require certain protections that come with it.

A domestic partnership can offer the best of both worlds. This allows unmarried couples who live together to obtain privileges similar to married couples. Although this term has been closely related to same-sex relationships in the past, it can be right for couples of any gender.

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